Tag Archives: Thomas J. Sargent

Sargent and Sims (2011): LIVE!

This year’s Nobel Prize Lectures in Economic Sciences: “United States Then, Europe Now” (at the nobelprize.org site) Thomas J. Sargent, New York University “Statistical Modeling of Monetary Policy and its Effects” (at the nobelprize.org site) Christopher A. Sims, Princeton University YouTube version of live TV broadcast of everything. Lectures start 10 minutes into the broadcast (with an introduction by Per Krusell):

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Don’t Fence Me In: Sargent rejects slogans

This is just a heads up for a recent interview with the new Nobel Laureate Thomas Sargent. In the New York Times article, “The Slogans Stop Here“, he explains the futility of trying to label economists as belonging to various theoretical or political “camps”. It is a great read, and I can’t help emphasizing the following: “If you go to seminars with guys who are actually doing the work and are trying to figure things out, it’s not ideological,” he said. “Half the people in the room may be Democrats and half may be Republicans. It just doesn’t matter.” These are simple, but great words. In my part of the … Continue reading

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Sargent and Sims (2011)

Today, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (yes, this is the long and formal title for the Nobel in economics), was awarded to Thomas J. Sargent and Christopher A. Sims. The following caption summarizes the motivation: “for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy” The longer motivation, and survey of the recipients’ academic contributions, can be found here (pdf 600 Kb). As a macroeconomist, I can only support this choice. These are definitely two of the profession’s “grand old men”, and it is difficult to write a modern paper without citing either of them, or both. Their influence in theoretical and … Continue reading

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